Japan

Megan, an American Youth Leadership Program with Japan participant, recently helped host a cultural festival at her high school in Beaverton, Oregon. The event was part of a culminating project for the AYLP, which took 30 high school students and three teachers from across the U.S. to Tokyo and Niigata for three weeks in the summer of ‘11. The final stage of this program challenges participants to implement educational and service projects which highlight the learning that took place during their exchange into their schools and communities.

Author: Cultural Vistas

Nancy Wilkin, a Bath, PA, native and high school chemistry teacher, was one of three educators from across the United States to participate in the inaugural American Youth Leadership Program with Japan:Japan-America Watershed Stewardship project. Below Nancy reflects on the impact this intercultural experience has had both personally and professionally.         

Most memorable part of your three weeks spent in Japan and why?      

Author: Cultural Vistas

On March 11, 2011 a tragedy of unprecedented proportions struck Japan. The magnitude-9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake, and the tsunami and nuclear accidents that followed, wreaked havoc on Japan’s northeastern coast. More than 15,000 lives were lost in the disaster, and hundreds of thousands were displaced when their homes were destroyed.

Author: Cultural Vistas

One of the subtle (but important) everyday differences between Japan and the United States: sleeping.

Take a look at how a few of our 30 U.S. high school students participating in the American Youth Leadership Program with Japan have been faring as they encounter one of several cross-cultural nuances.

Author: Cultural Vistas

Yuri packed her suitcase full of all she needed for one year in the U.S., piling a stack of Japanese school supplies on top in preparation for her volunteer work. Excitedly, she boarded a plane from Tokyo to Honolulu as a trainee on the Center for Cultural Interchange's Career Advancement Program (CAP).

Author: CCI Greenheart

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Sean McKnight, a Hermitage, PA, native, was one of 30 high school students from across the United States to participate in the inaugural American Youth Leadership Program with Japan:Japan-America Watershed Stewardship project (AYLP:JAWS). Below Sean reflects on the impact this intercultural experience has had on him.

Most memorable part of your three weeks spent in Japan

Author: Cultural Vistas

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