Funding

The Senate Appropriations Committee yesterday approved the 302(b) allocations for fiscal year 2014, providing $50.6 billion for FY14 State-Foreign Operations (SFOPS), and $52.2 billion for the overall International Affairs Budget (essentially level with current funding and similar to the President’s FY 14 request of $52.1), the U.S.

More articles about:

According to a draft schedule currently being circulated by the Senate Appropriations Committee, the panel is planning to mark up eight out of its twelve appropriations bills by mid-July, CQ.com recently reported.

More articles about:

More U.S. colleges and universities are helping finance study abroad experiences for low-income students, a trend that has increased the U.S. study abroad rate, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports.

Full text available to Alliance Members. Please use the "Member Log In" form on the left.

Heading back to work after the Memorial Day recess, Congress will begin soon to consider a number of its appropriations bills. As CQ.com reports, the key issue facing the State-Foreign Operations (SFOPS) appropriations bill (in which State Department exchange programs are funded) will be closing the gap between what the Senate wants (“to meet the White House’s request”) and what the House wants (“to cut deeply into the budget”).

Full text available to Alliance Members. Please use the "Member Log In" form on the left.

More articles about:

The House Appropriations Committee has released and begun to take up its FY14 subcommittee allocations. The Committee plans to mark-up a few appropriations bills at the end of May and beginning of June, including the Military Construction/Veterans Affairs, Homeland Security, Defense, and Agriculture bills. No specific timeframe has been announced for other bills, though our colleagues at Sixkiller Consulting note that the State-Foreign Operations bill will likely be marked up in the House in mid-to-late June. 

More articles about:

Released this morning after a 10-week delay, the President’s FY14 budget request cuts State Department international exchange programs by nearly $40 million. The FY14 requested level for exchanges, $562.7 million, is a 6.6 per cent decrease from current FY13 funding of $602.5 million, and an 11 per cent decrease from the previous high water mark of $635 million in FY10. 

Congress passed a new continuing resolution (CR) last week that funds the government for the remainder of FY 2013, but does not address sequestration. Funding for Department of State exchange programs will remain unchanged for the final six months of the fiscal year.

Full text available to Alliance Members. Please use the "Member Log In" form on the left.

“2013 will be a year in which the higher education sector, under increasing pressure to justify its value, will face more regulations and greater expectations to become self-sufficient” and will face both technological challenges and opportunities, Dr. Rahul Choudaha, director of research and advisory services at World Education Services (WES), writes in a recent University World News article.

Early in 2013, Congress and the White House finally reached an agreement to keep the U.S. from plunging over “the fiscal cliff.” While this agreement included some provisions on spending and revenue and resolved the expiration of the Bush tax cuts, it delayed the more critical decisions needed to prevent sequestration and achieve long-term deficit reduction. Because of this, sequestration and its embedded automatic spending cuts were not avoided but simply delayed, until March 1 – a date that both coincides with the time the U.S. is expected to again hit the debt ceiling, and is only weeks before the current FY 2013 continuing resolution (CR) expires, on March 27.

Full text available to Alliance Members. Please use the "Member Log In" form on the left.

More articles about:

While Tuesday’s election preserved the Congressional “status quo,” with the Democrats holding the Senate and Republicans retaining control of the House, significant changes to the committee make-up of both chambers appear likely.

The House’s committee make-up, in particular, is subject to major changes in part due to the large influx of new members in the last 2 elections, according to the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition (USGLC) 2012 Election Analysis:

More articles about:
Syndicate content