Study Abroad

With a civil war raging in their home country that has already killed thousands of civilians, 31 Yemeni high school exchange students are “trapped by uncertainty” as their U.S.

While the benefits of international experience and global skills are widely recognized, U.S. colleges and universities struggle to diversify access to international education and study abroad, according to a recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

On the occasion of the recent annual conference of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan stressed the importance of international education noting that:

Researchers at California’s Westmont College are engaging in a study that scans students’ brains in the hopes of detecting signs of growth brought about by study abroad experiences, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports.

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As it enters its second year, the Generation Study Abroad initiative will use scholarships and targeted outreach about study abroad programs – including more inclusive marketing materials – to increase diversity among study abroad participants, reports Insight Into Diversity.

EducationUSA has launched a new website to reach and inform a broader audience of prospective international students about opportunities to study in the U.S., The Pie News reports.

According to a recent study conducted by i-graduate, international students are generally satisfied with their study abroad experiences, reports Voice of America.

The U.S. Department of State announced that it will launch a study abroad branch to increase diversity among study abroad participants, build partnerships with foreign governments, and promote opportunities in non-traditional destinations, The Pie News reports.

Evan Ryan, the Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs, noted the State Department’s desire to increase diversity in study abroad participation and efforts in building partnerships:

Dr. Dan Davidson, president of the American Councils for International Education, testified last week in front of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs, discussing the merits of people-to-people exchanges and their ability to foster “positive social and economic changes.” He urged the subcommittee to increase support for exchanges in Eastern Europe and Eurasia, recent areas of conflict.

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Five former U.S. ambassadors to Germany believe that the decision to cut funding for the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange program (CBYX) by 50 per cent “runs contrary to U.S. interests”:

“At a time when our two countries need to work together more closely on numerous transatlantic and global issues, slashing this successful program is the wrong decision for German-American relations.”

The closure of a once commonly used visa track, for post-study international students to work in the U.K., has had negative impacts on British businesses and universities, The Pie News reports.

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