Study Abroad

U.S. student interest and enrollment in study abroad programs has not waned in spite of the recent terrorist attacks abroad, the Boston Globe reports.

The “students generally accept that security risks don’t necessarily increase beyond the U.S. borders,” the Boston Globe notes, adding that violent acts have occurred within U.S. borders for decades:

After studying at U.S. colleges and universities, Chinese students view themselves as more open-minded and idealistic, according to a recent article in Foreign Policy.

International exchanges are “more important than ever,” writes Vice Chair of Voter Registration and Participation for the Democratic National Committee (DNC) Donna Brazile in a recent op-ed published by ABC News.

Exchange programs provide great value for participants and help Americans to compete in a global economy, Brazile, a member of the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, explains:

Virtual exchanges are enhancing elementary and middle school classrooms in the U.S., connecting students with people across the world and offering valuable international perspectives, according to recent articles in Education Week and The PIE News.

International education and exchange are vital to U.S. diplomacy and allow students to acquire valuable skills and become leaders in their respective professions, Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Evan Ryan told The PIE News in a recent interview.

The U.S. experienced its largest growth in international student enrollments in the past 35 years, and the number of U.S. students studying abroad continues to grow as well, according to the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) 2015 Open Doors report, released this morning. The amount international students contribute to the U.S.

A newly formed Congressional International Exchange and Study Caucus aims to “raise awareness of the importance of international exchange and study programs in the United States and around the world,” according to a press release from U.S. Representatives Steve Pearce (R-NM) and Jim Himes (D-CT).

Access to high quality education, job opportunities, and adventure are the top three factors motivating students to pursue a STEM degree overseas, according to a recent British Council report, discussed by PIE News.

Through a host of new programs, some American students are pursuing what The New York Times calls, “extreme study abroad”: earning an undergraduate degree while traveling across various university campuses and continents.

The program models vary, but they share a common premise, focusing on an immersive, international education, according to the NYT:

In order to increase outbound student numbers, U.S. educators need to change their approach to study abroad “to work in the context of the U.S.,” according to Fanta Aw, President of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, as reported by PIE News.

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