Study Abroad

Being in contact with international students not only improves American students’ foreign language and cultural skills but also has a positive impact on their cognitive development, Businessweek reports citing a recent study run out of Duke University. The study—which is based on a 2005 online survey conducted among 5,600 members of the graduating classes of 1985, 1995 and 2000 from four highly selective U.S.

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 Acknowledging the impact international students have on their economies, countries worldwide are increasing their efforts to boost the “stay rate” of international students—the number of talented international students who decide to immigrate to their host country for longer periods of time, or even permanently, in order to live and work there—a recent ICEF Monitor article reports.

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In response to the current political unrest and protests held in Turkey, many U.S. universities are ending their study abroad programs or are arranging alternative plans for their students currently on programs in the country, reports USA Today.

As the Alliance reported last week, a Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) report revealed that international graduate school applications only grew by one per cent this year. A major factor in this slowing rate is a five per cent decline in applications from China, which had seen double-digit growth for the previous few years.

The decreasing number of international graduate student applications to U.S. campuses may cause the international education “bubble” to pop, potentially harming the U.S. academic and knowledge communities, according to a blog post published in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Turkey has become the top European country to send students to the U.S. for study, leaving behind Germany and Britain, which now rank 2nd and 3rd in terms of sending, the New York Times reports.

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The number of applications from prospective international students to U.S. graduate schools grew a mere 1 per cent in 2013, marking the smallest growth in these applications over the last eight years, a new Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) report shows. For comparison, the number of international grad school applications rose 9 per cent in 2012, and 11 per cent in 2011.

According to the New York Times, the European Commission recently introduced a new directive in order to lower bureaucratic hurdles for the approximately 200,000 students and researchers visiting from outside the European Union every year.

The commission said that the new rules would mandate maximum visa-processing periods of 60 days, easier transfers between member countries, and access to jobs during the stay.

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Intercultural skills are more important than ever in today’s business world, a recent study by Ipsos Public Affairs, the third largest market research company in the world, Booz Allen Hamilton a leading strategy and technology consulting firm and the British Council reveals.

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A Canadian government panel recommended in August that the country double its number of international students by 2022, the New York Times reports.

Currently, 100,000 international students are studying in Canada, triple the number who studied there in 2000.

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