Study Abroad

“2013 will be a year in which the higher education sector, under increasing pressure to justify its value, will face more regulations and greater expectations to become self-sufficient” and will face both technological challenges and opportunities, Dr. Rahul Choudaha, director of research and advisory services at World Education Services (WES), writes in a recent University World News article.

While a record 274,000 American students studied abroad for credit last year, it is becoming increasingly important to enhance this academic experience with an international work record, the New York Times suggests.

Because of the complexity of today’s conflicts around the world, it is vital for the U.S. to increase student exchanges, particularly with China, James Goldgeiger, Dean of the School of International Service (SIS) at American University (AU), argues in a recent Huffington Post article.

International exchanges are essential in “bridging the intersection between policy and public diplomacy” and help “empower future generations of political leaders,” Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Tara Sonenshine told an audience at George Washington University’s Elliot School of Foreign Affairs last Thursday.

The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ (ECA) institutionalization of program evaluation has become a role model for the Department of State and U.S. public diplomacy, Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Tara Sonenshine told an audience at the Heritage Foundation yesterday.

The Department of Education recently released its “first-ever, fully articulated international strategy” designed to advance two strategic goals: strengthening U.S. education and advancing the U.S.’ international priorities. The strategy, which focuses on the next four years, recognizes that it is no longer enough to teach American students only reading, writing, mathematics, and science skills; rather, students must also have “the skills and disposition to engage globally,” as well as “the ability to think critically and creatively to solve complex problems.”

International students and their families contributed more than $21.81 billion to the U.S. economy last year, according to an economic impact statement for the academic year 2011-12, released by NAFSA: Association of International Educators today.

The number of international students enrolled at U.S. universities has increased by 5.7 per cent, according to the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Open Doors 2012 report, released today at a briefing that kicked off this year's International Education Week. Open Doors 2012 also reveals that international students contributed more than $22.7 billion to the U.S. economy in 2011-12, according to U.S. Department of Commerce data.

The Open Doors report is released annually by IIE with the support of the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA). 

Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Ann Stock will kick off the 13th International Education Week (IEW) by releasing the 2012 Open Doors report on Tuesday, November 13. Open Doors, a collaboration between the Institute of International Education (IIE) and the Department of State, is an annual publication that provides authoritative data on foreign students in the U.S.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton prominently featured the role of exchanges in her remarks to staff at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing during her travels to China earlier this month.

Acknowledging that the relationship between China and the U.S. is “a complicated relationship,” Clinton affirmed the administration’s strong belief in U.S.-China relations and the crucial role people-to-people exchanges play in fostering and maintaining strong ties between the two countries:

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